Monday, September 05, 2005

Let me know what you think

I'd really love to hear from you, my readers and listeners. Tell me what you think of the podcast and the blog. I especially want to hear requests for topics, recipes, spotlight foods, and food science questions.

Having trouble with a recipe? Want advice on a killer dish for that special night with your sweetie? Curious about some aspect of the professional life of a chef? Let me know. I will try to answer all requests. You can add a comment here, or you can reach me via e-mail at remarkablepalate@aol.com

4 Comments:

At 12:32 AM, September 06, 2005, Blogger Joe said...

Just started reading your blog and catching up. Great pictures and your dishes are amazing!

 
At 10:04 AM, September 06, 2005, Blogger ReMARKable Palate said...

Thanks, Joe. I'm from Albuquerque, so I love seeing the Southwest represented in the blog world. I hope you don't mind my saying, you have lovely wontons!

 
At 4:11 PM, September 07, 2005, Anonymous Julie said...

Having joined a CSA mid-stream a few weeks ago I've recently been making refrigerator pickles, both sweet and savory. My question is, how low can I cut the salt or sugar in the brine and about how long will the brine be safe to use?

 
At 4:28 PM, September 07, 2005, Blogger ReMARKable Palate said...

Pickling is an interesting topic. there are many different ways to pickle vegetables, and tachniques that come from Jewish, Asian, and South American sources. The brine can include vinegar or not, but usually the pickles that don't have vinegar won't last very long. Classic Kosher pickles use about 1/3 cup kosher salt to each cup of water, and no vinegar. They will last about a week. I would not go any lower than this, as it will take moger to pickle, and they won't taste as good.

Salting alone doesn't preserve vegetables to last through the winter. It does draw out the water to make the veggies more crsip. If you want to preserve them long term, you have to go the old fashioned route of using a vinegar brine and sterilizing your canning equipment. It's alot of work, but worth it in February when you open up a jar!

 

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